6/17/2014

REVIEW: Boris The Blade - The Human Hive


Genre: Technical Death Metal/Deathcore
Label: Century Media/Siege Of Amida
Date of Release: May 9, 2014

MODERN DEATH

Australian deathcore group Boris The Blade formed in 2010 from Melbourne, and has since gained a decent underground following with their debut EP "Tides of Damnation" released in 2011. They later struck large with renowned labels such as Century Media and Siege Of Amida, and afterwards, they unleashed their first full-length called "The Human Hive" in 2014.

The musicianship in this album is very good. The vocals, while nothing too special, do deliver in their aggression, something that is quite essential in a death metal or deathcore release. The guitars and drums, on the other hand, are where the band's instrumental prowess mostly lies; both are performed with a lot of complexity without losing its ground, and they lend themselves to a handful of memorable parts throughout the record's running time.


Matt Shorter of RTD Studios, the same place where the band recorded their EP, is the one behind the record's production yet again, and it turned out great here. It manages to underline every blast beat and breakdown to make them sound powerful and resonant. It certainly works a lot in the album's favor.

Even though this album is essentially a specimen of technical deathcore, it does seem to take in some black/death metal influence along the lines of acts such as Behemoth, partially thanks to its stellar production. This does very much add to the sinister, brutal sound that this band is clearly trying to get across. On top of that, structure-wise, "The Human Hive" just about hits all of the check marks. For the most part, the songs know when to be slow and when to be fast, proving to have a good amount of dynamic without betraying their flow.

There are two major highlights in this album's tracklist: The first is "Mortal Procession," which demonstrates the record's great sense of speed and dynamic the best out of all the tracks. Similar things can be said for the other highlight that this release has to offer, simply entitled "Desolation." It also tackles the aforementioned aspects very nicely, second only to the former song. Though the album as a whole is very decent, these two appear to stand out the most.

The major problem with "The Human Hive," however, is that after a while, it does begin to lose some steam. There are times where the songs tend to feel a little repetitive, resulting in the release as a whole not being quite as strong as it could have been. Along with that, songs such as "Atrophy," while not necessarily bad, do feel too underwhelming in terms of making a lasting impact.

In spite of that, however, "The Human Hive" is a fairly strong deathcore piece. Even though its edge does start to fade as it goes on, it still boasts impressive musicianship, solid structuring, great sound mixing, and some good highlights. Although it could have held its ground a bit sturdier if the tracks were more deep and diverse, anyone who even remotely enjoys the deathcore genre may want to keep their eyes peeled on this group.

Score: 7.5/10 (Solid+)